Anxiety responds really well to treatment.

You are not alone if you experience anxiety. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults in the United States age 18 and older, or 18.1% of the population every year.* Anxiety can take hold at any stage of life. Many people start having anxiety symptoms when their young but don’t realize how problematic they are until they reach adulthood.

Depression
It's not uncommon for someone with an anxiety disorder to also suffer from depression or vice versa. Nearly one-half of those diagnosed with depression are also diagnosed with an anxiety disorder.*

Children
Anxiety disorders affect 25.1% of children between 13 and 18 years old. Research shows that untreated children with anxiety disorders are at higher risk to perform poorly in school, miss out on important social experiences, and engage in substance abuse.*

Do you ever feel like this?
”Even when things are wonderful, I’m always waiting for something terrible to happen.”
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Signs of anxiety

  • Feeling nervous, irritable or on edge

  • Having a sense of impending danger, panic or doom

  • Having an increased heart rate

  • Breathing rapidly (hyperventilation), sweating, and/or trembling

  • Feeling weak or tired

  • Difficulty concentrating

  • Having trouble sleeping

  • Experiencing gastrointestinal (GI) problems

Anxiety doesn’t have anything to do with courage or character. Nothing at all.

types of anxiety and related disorders

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Panic Disorder (PD)
Social Anxiety Disorder
Specific Phobias
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

treatment options

There are a number of effective Treatments for Anxiety and our team is skilled in all of these treatments. Let us know if you have a preference when you contact us and we will connect you with the right person.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
A well-established, highly effective, and lasting treatment is called cognitive-behavioral therapy, or CBT. It focuses on identifying, understanding, and changing thinking and behavior patterns. Benefits are usually seen in 12 to 16 weeks, depending on the individual.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)
Also known as ACT, this type of therapy uses strategies of acceptance and mindfulness (living in the moment and experiencing things without judgment), along with commitment and behavior change, as a way to cope with unwanted thoughts, feelings, and sensations. ACT imparts skills to accept these experiences, place them in a different context, develop greater clarity about personal values, and commit to needed behavior change.

Exposure Therapy
A form of CBT, exposure therapy is a process for reducing fear and anxiety responses. In therapy, a person is gradually exposed to a feared situation or object, learning to become less sensitive over time. This type of therapy has been found to be particularly effective for obsessive-compulsive disorder and phobias.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)
Integrating cognitive-behavioral techniques with concepts from Eastern meditation, dialectical behavioral therapy, or DBT, combines acceptance and change. DBT involves individual and group therapy to learn mindfulness, as well as skills for interpersonal effectiveness, tolerating distress, regulating emotions.

Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)
Often referred to as IPT, interpersonal therapy is a short-term supportive psychotherapy that addresses interpersonal issues in depression in adults, adolescents, and older adults. IPT usually involves 12 to 16 one-hour weekly sessions. The initial sessions are devoted to gathering information about the nature of a person’s depression and interpersonal experience.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)
Under certain conditions eye movements appear to reduce the intensity of disturbing thoughts. A treatment known as eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, or EMDR, seems to have a direct effect on the way that the brain processes information. Basically, it helps a person see disturbing material in a less distressing way. EMDR appears to be similar to what occurs naturally during dreaming or REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Scientific research has established EMDR as effective for posttraumatic stress disorder. And clinicians also have reported success using it to treat panic attacks and phobias.


The information on this page is informed by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.